Leant vs Leaned

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What’s the difference between them?

Leant

Meaning:

Leant means to bend or incline from a vertical position.

Examples:

1. Exhausted from the long hike, Sarah leaned against a tree to catch her breath.

2. As the train rumbled along the tracks, passengers leaned back in their seats, enjoying the scenic views.

3. With a curious expression, the cat cautiously leaned over the edge of the table to investigate the intriguing object below.

Leaned

Meaning:

American spellin of 'leant.'

Examples:

1. She leaned against the wall and closed her eyes.

2. He leaned forward to look closer at the object.

3. She leaned in to whisper in his ear.

Learn similar and opposite words to spot the difference

Synonyms

Antonyms

Leant

1. Inclined

2. Slanted

3. Canted

4. Titled

5. Bent at an Angle

1. Upright

2. Erect

3. Bolstered

4. Supported

5. Not inclined

Leaned

1. Tilted

2. Sloped

3. Bent

4. Inclined

5. Resting at an angle

1. Unleaned

2. Stood upright

3. Balanced

4. Uprighted

5. Swayed away

Tricks for mastery

Useful tips to understand the difference between confusing words "Leant", "Leaned".

1. If you're aiming for American English, think of the 'ed' ending as common in the US, so use 'leaned.'

2. If you're aiming for British English, remember the 't' ending which is more traditional in the UK, and use 'leant.'

3. Think of other verbs in American English that have an 'ed' ending, like 'learned' or 'burned.' This can remind you of 'leaned.'

4. In British English, there are words like 'learnt' and 'spelt' which can remind you of 'leant.'

Check the full list of commonly confused words in English

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Frequently asked questions

In what situations should the first word be used?

'Leant' is a British English spelling of the word used to describe the act of bending or inclining something from a vertical position. It is often used in contexts where British English is the standard. For example, 'She leant against the wall.'

When is the appropriate context for using the second word?

'Leaned' is the American English spelling of the same word and is used in American English writing and speech. It also means to bend or incline from a vertical position. For instance, 'He leaned back in his chair.'

Do the two words share the same pronunciation?

Yes, 'leant' and 'leaned' share the same pronunciation. They are both typically pronounced as /liːnt/ with the emphasis on the first syllable.

What are some common mistakes people make when using these words?

One common mistake is using 'leant' in American English or 'leaned' in British English, which can be seen as incorrect spellings in their respective dialects. It's essential to use the appropriate spelling based on the regional variant of English you are using. Mixing the spellings can be seen as an error.

Fill in the gaps to check yourself

1. He ________ against the wall, waiting for her to finish speaking.

2. In a classic American film, the main character ________ on a lamppost while singing in the rain.

3. The tree ________ towards the east because of the constant wind in that direction.

4. When in London, she observed that many locals said they ________ on the railing to watch the parade.

5. The cowboy ________ casually against the entrance of the saloon, surveying the scene.

6. Despite being in a hurry, she stopped and ________ over to tie her shoelaces.

1. He leaned/leant against the wall, waiting for her to finish speaking.

Explanation: Without any specific regional context in the sentence, both the American spelling leaned and the British spelling leant are acceptable.

2. In a classic American film, the main character leaned on a lamppost while singing in the rain.

Explanation: The clue American film suggests the use of American English, so leaned is the appropriate choice.

3. The tree leaned/leant towards the east because of the constant wind in that direction.

Explanation: This sentence doesnt give a specific regional context, so both leaned and leant are correct.

4. When in London, she observed that many locals said they leant on the railing to watch the parade.

Explanation: The clue London and locals indicates British English, making leant the correct choice.

5. The cowboy leaned/leant casually against the entrance of the saloon, surveying the scene.

Explanation: Without a clear regional context, both the American spelling leaned and the British spelling leant are acceptable.

6. Despite being in a hurry, she stopped and leaned/leant over to tie her shoelaces.

Explanation: This sentence doesnt specify a regional context, so both leaned and leant are correct.

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List of Commonly Confused Words

Finding your way around the English language can be hard, especially since there are so many confusing words and rules. So, a list of the most confusing words in English is an extremely useful tool for improving language accuracy and sharing the ideas clearly.