Got vs Gotten

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What’s the difference between them?

Got

Meaning:

past tense of 'get,' meaning to obtain, acquire, or receive something.

Examples:

1. I got the job!

2. I got an A+ on my test.

3. I got to go to the beach this weekend.

Gotten

Meaning:

past tense and past participle of 'get'.

Examples:

1. I've gotten used to the long commute.

2. He's gotten a promotion at work.

3. I've gotten a lot of positive feedback from my boss.

Learn similar and opposite words to spot the difference

Synonyms

Antonyms

Got

1. Obtained

2. Procured

3. Acquired

4. Attained

5. Reaped

1. Lost

2. Failed

3. Rejected

4. Denied

5. Not Acquired

Gotten

1. Acquired

2. Procured

3. Obtained

4. Gained

5. Secured

1. Lost

2. Unobtained

3. Missed

4. Neglected

5. Not Acquired

Tricks for mastery

Useful tips to understand the difference between confusing words "Got", "Gotten".

1. Got is the past tense of the verb 'to get'. For example, 'I got a new car.'

2. Gotten is the past participle of get. It is usually used in American English. For example, 'I have gotten a new car.'

3. Got is used for simple past tense statements, such as 'I got a new car.'

4. Gotten is used for perfect tense statements and passive voice, such as 'I have gotten a new car.'

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Frequently asked questions

When should 'got' be used?

The simple past tense of the verb 'get' is 'got'. It can be used when referring to something that has already been acquired, or to describe an action that has already been completed. For example, 'I got a new job' or 'I got a good grade on my test'.

When is the appropriate context for using 'gotten'?

The past participle of the verb 'get' is 'gotten'. It is most often used to describe something that has been acquired recently, or an action that has recently been completed. For example, 'She has gotten a new job' or 'I have gotten a good grade on my test'.

Do the two words share the same pronunciation?

No, got is pronouned /got/, while gotten is pronounced /goten/

What are some common mistakes people make when using these words?

A common mistake people make when using these words is using 'gotten' in place of 'got' in a simple past tense sentence. For example, the correct sentence would be 'I got a good grade on my test', rather than 'I gotten a good grade on my test'. Another mistake is using 'got' instead of 'gotten' when referring to something that has recently been acquired or an action that has recently been completed. The correct sentence would be 'She has gotten a new job', rather than 'She has got a new job'.

Fill in the gaps to check yourself

1. Have you ever ___ what you wanted?

2. She has ___ good grades in school.

3. He had ___ a promotion at work.

4. The team has ___ a few wins this season.

5. They had to ___ up early for the meeting.

6. Hes never ___ a chance to explain himself.

1. Have you ever gotten what you wanted?

Explanation: The correct word to fill the gap is gotten because it is the past participle of the verb get and it is used in the present perfect tense.

2. She has got good grades in school.

Explanation: The correct word to fill the gap is got because it is the present simple form of the verb get and it is used to describe an action that is ongoing or habitual.

3. He had gotten a promotion at work.

Explanation: The correct word to fill the gap is gotten because it is the past participle of the verb get and it is used in the past perfect tense.

4. The team has gotten a few wins this season.

Explanation: The correct word to fill the gap is gotten because it is the past participle of the verb get and it is used in the present perfect tense.

5. They had to get up early for the meeting.

Explanation: The correct word to fill the gap is get because it is the infinitive of the verb get and it is used to describe an action that was required.

6. Hes never got a chance to explain himself.

Explanation: The correct word to fill the gap is got because it is the present simple form of the verb get and it is used to describe an action that is ongoing or habitual.

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List of Commonly Confused Words

Finding your way around the English language can be hard, especially since there are so many confusing words and rules. So, a list of the most confusing words in English is an extremely useful tool for improving language accuracy and sharing the ideas clearly.