More Than vs More Then

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What’s the difference between them?

More Than

Meaning:

More than means greater in amount, number, or size than a specified amount or number.

Examples:

1. I have more than enough money to buy a new car.

2. I have been working here for more than ten years.

3. I need more than just your support to get through this.

More Then

Meaning:

Misspelling of “more than.”

Examples:

no examples

Learn similar and opposite words to spot the difference

Synonyms

Antonyms

More Than

Over

exceeding

Less Than

More Then

This word doesn't exist, so there are no synonyms for it.

This word doesn't exist, so there are no antonyms for it.

Tricks for mastery

Useful tips to understand the difference between confusing words "More Than", "More Then".

1. More Than is the correct phrase and should be used when comparing two or more things, expressing a greater quantity, or expressing a higher degree than something else. For example, 'I have more than enough money to buy the car.'

2. More Then is incorrect and should not be used. The phrase more then is not a recognized English phrase.

3. Mnemonic tip: Remember to use 'More Than' by thinking, 'more is always THAN something else.'

Check the full list of commonly confused words in English

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Frequently asked questions

When to use the first word?

The phrase 'more than' is used to express a greater amount or number, such as 'I have more than enough money.' It can also be used to compare two things, like 'She is more than twice as tall as I am.' The phrase 'more than' is also used in the sense of 'beyond,' like 'more than I can say,' or 'more than I can bear.'

When to use the second word?

The phrase 'more then' is not actually a word. It is incorrect, and is often mistaken for the correct phrase 'more than.' For example, 'I have more then enough money' is incorrect. It should be 'I have more than enough money.'

Do the words have the same pronunciation?

Yes, these phrases have similar pronunciation, but the only correct phrase is 'more than.'

What are common mistakes associated with words?

One of the most common mistakes made with 'more than' and 'more then' is confusing the two. People often use 'more then' instead of 'more than' when the correct phrase should be 'more than.' Additionally, people often forget to use the word 'more' before either phrase, such as 'He is twice as tall than I am.' This should be 'He is more than twice as tall as I am.'

Fill in the gaps to check yourself

1. I can see that you have worked hard, but Im afraid its not enough - you need to do _______ that.

2. I love this restaurant - their food is _______ just delicious, its amazing!

3. I want to make sure that I get the best, so Im willing to pay _______ the asking price.

4. Could you give me _______ just a few minutes to explain my point of view?

5. I didnt realize that it would require _______ just a bit of effort.

6. Sometimes it feels like Im asking for the impossible - I need _______ just your support.

1. more than.

Explanation: The phrase more than is used when comparing two or more things, as in this sentence, to express that the second part of the comparison must exceed or be greater than the first part.

2. more than.

Explanation: The phrase more than is used when comparing two or more things, as in this sentence, to express that the second part of the comparison must exceed or be greater than the first part.

3. more than.

Explanation: The phrase more than is used when comparing two or more things, as in this sentence, to express that the second part of the comparison must exceed or be greater than the first part.

4. more than.

Explanation: The phrase more than is used when comparing two or more things, as in this sentence, to express that the second part of the comparison must exceed or be greater than the first part.

5. more than.

Explanation: The phrase more than is used when comparing two or more things, as in this sentence, to express that the second part of the comparison must exceed or be greater than the first part.

6. more than.

Explanation: The phrase more than is used when comparing two or more things, as in this sentence, to express that the second part of the comparison must exceed or be greater than the first part.

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List of Commonly Confused Words

Finding your way around the English language can be hard, especially since there are so many confusing words and rules. So, a list of the most confusing words in English is an extremely useful tool for improving language accuracy and sharing the ideas clearly.