Everything vs All Things

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What’s the difference between them?

Everything

Meaning:

a pronoun that means all things or all people, regardless of individual characteristics; refers to all things as a single unit.

Examples:

1. Everything seems to be working as expected.

2. Everything is going to be alright in the end.

3. I don't have to worry about anything because I have everything I need.

All Things

Meaning:

plural noun phrase that refers to all things we are talking about.

Examples:

1. 'All things must come to an end.'

2. 'We can learn from all things, both good and bad.'

3. 'She believed in making the most of all things.'

Learn similar and opposite words to spot the difference

Synonyms

Antonyms

Everything

1. All

2. Entirety

3. Total

4. Everything and Anything

5. All Things Considered

1. Nothing

2. Nothingness

3. Absence

4. Inaction

5. Opposite

All Things

1. Everything

2. Whole shebang

3. Total package

4. All and sundry

5. Aggregate

1. Nothing

2. Opposite

3. Nothingness

4. Reverse

5. Contradiction

Tricks for mastery

Useful tips to understand the difference between confusing words "Everything", "All Things".

1. 'Everything' is for the overall collective, 'all things' is for the individual items.

2. 'Everything' is for the big picture, 'all things' for the details.

3. 'Everything' means all of it, 'all things' means each of the parts.

Check the full list of commonly confused words in English

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Frequently asked questions

In what situations should the word 'everything' be used?

'Everything' should be used to refer to the entirety of something. For example, you could say 'I want everything on this list' to refer to all the items on the list.

When is the appropriate context for using the phrase 'all things'?

The phrase 'all things' is used to refer to the entirety of a group of items or concepts. For example, you could say 'All things considered, the situation isn't so bad.'

Do the two words share the same pronunciation?

No, everything is pronounced /ˈev.ri.θɪŋ/, while all things is pronounced /ol θɪŋs/.

What are some common mistakes people make when using these words?

A common mistake people make when using these words is confusing the two. While 'everything' refers to the entirety of one item or concept, 'all things' refers to the entirety of a group of items or concepts. Another mistake is using 'all things' when one could use 'everything'; for example, 'I want all things on this list' should be 'I want everything on this list'.

Fill in the gaps to check yourself

1. She told me that ________ happens for a reason, and I should be patient.

2. In American supermarkets, you can find almost ________ you might need for cooking.

3. The British museum has a collection of ________ from ancient civilizations.

4. ________ in the world has its own unique beauty.

5. Ive packed ________ for our camping trip, including the tent and the stove.

6. ________ considered, I believe we made the right decision.

1. She told me that everything happens for a reason, and I should be patient.

Explanation: Here, the reference is to events or occurrences in a general, singular unit sense. Everything is appropriate as it refers to all occurrences as a single concept.

2. In American supermarkets, you can find almost everything you might need for cooking.

Explanation: American supermarkets are known for their vast variety. The sentence suggests that you can find all items taken as a collective whole, so everything fits better.

3. The British museum has a collection of all things from ancient civilizations.

Explanation: Museums typically have various individual items from different categories. All things is more appropriate as it refers to a wide range of individual items.

4. Everything in the world has its own unique beauty.

Explanation: The sentence is talking about every individual thing in the world as part of a collective whole. Everything is the correct choice.

5. Ive packed everything for our camping trip, including the tent and the stove.

Explanation: The context implies a collection of items needed for the camping trip as a whole, making everything suitable.

6. All things considered, I believe we made the right decision.

Explanation: This is a common phrase that means taking into account all the individual factors or considerations. All things is the correct choice.

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List of Commonly Confused Words

Finding your way around the English language can be hard, especially since there are so many confusing words and rules. So, a list of the most confusing words in English is an extremely useful tool for improving language accuracy and sharing the ideas clearly.